WHO epidemiologist warns that “constellation of future mutations” could raise questions about the efficacy of the Covid vaccine

World leaders presented vaccines to the public as a return to normalcy, and US President Joe Biden pledged to “Summer of Freedom” If its goal of vaccinating 70% of Americans by July 4 is met. Even against the most transmissible variants of the coronavirus – eg the ‘delta variant’, first discovered in India – vaccines have been promoted as effective and safe.

The World Health Organization is still concerned. During a briefing on Monday, epidemiologist Maria Van Kerkhove said that vaccines could one day be ineffective against “Constellation of Mutations” may arise in the future.

Kerkhove talked about “next generation” Vaccines against covid It will be produced in the future. But he insisted We also have other tools. To prevent infection. Van Kerkhove did not specify what these tools were, but was likely referring to concealment, social distancing, and similar measures when he urged listeners to “Do what you can…to prevent yourself from getting infected…and to prevent further spread if you are infected.” “

Viruses generally mutate over time, with most mutations making the pathogen less lethal. For example, mutations in the H1N1 virus that killed about 50 million people worldwide a century ago still infect people with every flu season.

The delta variant of Covid-19 is considered a ‘The worrying alternative’ by the World Health Organization, as well as three other mutations first discovered in the UK, South Africa and Brazil, although none appear to be more lethal than the ones that preceded them.

Covid-related deaths globally have fallen steadily since the beginning of this year, according to WHO data, with 95 countries reporting more than 7,500 deaths in the last week of May, up from about 50,000 during the first week of the year. Hospitalizations hit a record high in March, but are now lower than at any time since March 2020.

READ  Deep Faking: Is Too Much Effort To Get Little Results? | Science | News | the sun

Do you think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *