Horipad Pro Xbox Series X / S game console test: Far from benchmarks

A wired controller requires, fortunately, imperceptible command latency. Thus the accuracy of the analog sticks can be fully expressed, and they also provide good flexibility. We appreciate the small, smooth plastic rings arranged around the circumference of the casing of the sticks, which soften the connection to the axis of the latter, for greater fluidity. However, in our test version, we notice a slight triggering of the right stick ring, which results in small clicks that aren’t very pleasant to the touch or to the ear.

On the directional crossover side, those sensitive to the very loud clicks of those that supply the official Xbox Series console will be happy to know that support in different directions takes place here in silence. Accuracy remains good despite everything, although it is difficult to press well on the diagonals.

Regarding the main buttons, there are no complaints, the recoil is good and their activation remains quite discreet. The same goes for the other buttons on the front of the console.

If the Horipad Pro has been doing well until then, everything changes when it comes to talking about the triggers, and the real disappointments negate the positive results so far than we did. First of all, the LB and RB button triggers are soft and set too far to be easily activated with the second phalanx of the index fingers. But that’s nothing compared to the spongy feel of the analog LT and RT triggers, which dispels any hope of accuracy. Especially since their advantageous path stops about halfway, leaving a complete dead zone. Calibration does not change this. If this isn’t an issue in a shooter, it’s a whole different story in a racing game where it comes to tuning acceleration or even braking.

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