How do animals sleep

What do the nights of the monsters look like? Can they sleep peacefully? A documentary film examines these questions.

Continuing under this ad

Recharging batteries in nature is essential for surviving, escaping from predators, and finding food. And that’s no matter what species, bee, macaque or sea lion. How do animals not abandon their vigilance, not forgetting to return to the surface when they need to breathe? How is their sleep? Aarti documentary, aired on Saturday 9th April at 11:50 PM, Animals sleep a riddle for scienceprovides some answers.

Orangutans, bed heroes

These great apes have sleep cycles very similar to those of humans. It is also believed that early men built themselves beds in trees like themselves. These primates, especially concerned about their comfort, make nests, sometimes reaching 30 meters in height, in the canopy. And they always think of building a layer of drooping leaves for themselves for shelter. Such comfortable beds allow them, according to the researchers, to sleep better and thus develop their cognitive abilities.

In the sea, sea lions sleep with one eye open

Like cetaceans, these marine mammals must regularly come to the surface to breathe. In order not to forget to do this, sea lions are able to sleep only two hemispheres of their brains. So they always keep half of their brains awake. Deft!

As bees take a nap

Celebrity workers and foragers need rest just like the rest of us to be at their best. Even the toughest workers fall asleep at one time or another. The bees rest in the brood hives for several hours a day. Experiments have shown that those who lack sleep communicate much less with their peers than those who are well rested.

See also  Older adults need more protein

TV program :

Animals sleep a riddle for scienceUnpublished Documentary, Saturday 9th April at 11.50pm on Aarti.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.