Literary Shalevox | Maison Riviera passes into French hands

Laiterie Chalifoux becomes French. Sorel-Tracy, known for its tiny Maison Riviera yogurt glassware, has moved on to the Alsace Lait co-op and its general manager, Frédéric Madon.


Nathael Morissette

Nathael Morissette
Journalism

When you tickle adults [producteurs]You have to keep innovating. So, it takes money. We might have had less ambition, which I would put it this way. While Mr. Maddon and his teams may have more ambition, [plus de volonté] to work and invest a lot of money,” Alan Shalevo, President of Laiterie, explained during an interview with Journalism, With Frederic Madonne. When asked extensively about the decision to abandon his family’s business, which was founded 100 years ago, the man asserted that he had been playing with the idea for three years.

Photo by David Boyle, Press

Laiterie Chalifoux President Alain Chalifoux (left) and General Director of Alsace Lait Collaboration Frédéric Madon

Suddenly, the person who was part of the 4NS A generation of the Chalifoux family to lead the company asserts that this change of custody will ensure the “sustainability” and “future development” of the dairy that will retain the Sorel Tracy plant and its head office located in Varennes. The transaction amount was not disclosed. Under the Maison Riviera brand, Laiterie produces yoghurt, fine cheese, yogurt, butter, cream, milk and plant-based products, for a total of 195 items available in supermarkets.

The news was announced to the company’s 170 workers on Friday morning. On the Alsace lait side – which is one of the 25 largest dairy companies in France – there are certainly no jobs threatened and operations will operate as before. Laiterie Chalifoux produces approximately 4 million kilograms of milk annually. Remember that the company, which operates the Maison Riviera brand, has already been working with Alsace Lait for a few years now. In 2015, it sold 40% of its shares to the French Cooperative to expand its product range. “You had to be innovative and find new products,” says Mr. Shalevo.

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Six months after the start of this partnership, Laiterie launched, in September 2015, the Petit Pot, the famous yoghurt in glass containers, which became the company’s flagship product.

Nearly six years after beginning her relationship with Alsace Lait, Chalifoux decides to sell him all of the business except for Chalifoux Casse-Croûte Bar laitier, who will remain in the family. In Sorel, [le casse-croûte]”It’s part of the habits: going for ice cream, going for the freshest curds of the day, going to buy milk,” he proudly recalls, Alan Schleifaux. It is a meeting point that people have lived with for decades and decades. We said to each other, ‘We’re keeping it,’ he said, adding that his father, now 80, and his uncle were still happy to go there and ‘won’t go… for five minutes.’

PHOTO MARTIN TREMBLAY, PRESS ARCHIVES

Losing a Quebec identity?

Moreover, even though the company is now a French property, Mr. Chalevaux assures that Laiterie will keep its roots in Quebec. He remembers that the current General Manager, Mr. Madon, who is partly making the acquisition, has lived in the county for a year and will settle there forever with his wife. “He made Quebec, loves Quebec, his family is coming here.”

Frederic Madon added, “I am the only Frenchman who attended. The teams I have in France are still in France. It is a will on my part not to take them because I consider the experience and knowledge to be here in Quebec and Canada.”

Starting next year, Mr. Madon intends to develop an entirely new product line. He also wants to be more present in all of Canada, especially with the fine cheeses. “We have a history in Quebec, which is undeniable because it is the DNA of the company, but along with it is our desire to continue to develop this knowledge of Quebec, nationwide in Canada.”

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And the cheese curds are here to stay? “Since 1959, he has been solid,” he hurries to answer Mr. Shalevo. A few seconds later, Mr. Madon adds that this classic is one of his “company gems”. He says he has no intention of stopping his production.

If at any time the General Manager needed advice on how to steer the boat, he could consult Mr. Shalevo, whom he considered a friend. “I will never be far away,” assures Alan Shalevo. I really don’t feel bitter about it. ”

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