A quantum wizard designed at UdeS and applauded by Quebec Science | News | Tribune

Collaborate moving forward

In 2017, the duo chose Sherbrooke to join a team from the University of New South Wales in Australia to investigate quantitative calculations in previously unreached temperatures. Researchers in Japan also contributed to this discovery.

The knowledge of Mr Pioro-Ladrière and Mr Camirand Lemyre regarding the micro-magnet technology, which makes it possible to control the rotational qubits, associated with the knowledge of Andrew Dzurak’s team in Australia, who on his part designs “high quality” rotation qubits, will enable them to set up this processor.

“It’s not very common in society,” says Michel Buro-Ladrier, who remembers how fierce the competition in this race for the global quantum computer was.

“What is normal in our field is to see theoretical groups combine with experimental groups. Here, we are two experimental groups, generally in competition, we have chosen to join forces to develop research. It is a very fruitful collaboration that is not over yet. We need more discipline to get things moving.” Faster, “he thinks.

Now having a PhD in Physics, Julian Cameran Lemery claims that for his part, a year ago, he started the Nord quantique company in Sherbrooke that allows him to participate in Mr. Pioro-Ladrière’s research.

“We are working on quantum technologies that complement what was accomplished in the context of my message,” he explains.

“The interesting thing is that quantum computing is no longer just a science, it is now a technology. There are companies around the world that have succeeded in performing calculations that no computer on this planet can do today.” He concludes by saying, “The dream has become a little reality.”

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