An ambitious list for the first 100 days of the Trudeau government’s re-election

According to their platform, the Liberals plan to reintroduce four bills that died on the demand paper when Parliament was dissolved and which will likely start the process again, in some very onerous cases.

Those who had banned conversion therapy (C-6) and broadcast law reform (C-10) went to the Senate in June, after months of bans by conservatives. Those related to the abolition of the mandatory minimum sentences (C-22) and the modernization of the Official Languages ​​Act (C-32) remained on first reading, i.e. just scheduling the bill.

We also plan to introduce two new bills to the web giants: one that requires digital platforms to share a portion of their revenue with Canadian media outlets, such as Australia, and one that aims to fight content toxic Online and this would make the social media platforms responsible for the content you host.

Canadian Heritage Minister Stephen Gilboe argued in an interview with The Canadian Press that the government has been about to fall The Internet Hate Bill, which had been the subject of consultations with 150 organisations, was ahead of its departure in the summer. The summer period allowed for more consultations, this time with Canadians.

I think we are in a good position to move forward quickly in this matter, He said.

Behind the scenes, we acknowledge that the liberal legislative slate is ambitious, especially as the fall is likely to be busy, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s stated priorities regarding COVID-19 vaccination and childcare agreements negotiated with the rest of the countries. counties. There is a United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) to prepare.

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The counting of the first 100 days will begin when the new cabinet ministers are sworn in, scheduled for October. The prime minister said parliamentary work would resume in the fall. The date has not yet been determined.

The government’s parliamentary leader, Pablo Rodriguez, declined to be interviewed on the progress of legislative priorities in the context of minorities. But a government source said that the government will rely on the support of other parties fast forward On the promises of the first 100 days and the priorities set by Mr. Trudeau.

Quebec bloc leader Yves Francois Blanchett suggested this week that a motion be adopted in the House of Commons to resume several bills in the 43rd Parliament where members left them, in order to avoid having to go through the sometimes arduous legislative process again.

Accordingly, the government source specifies that Mr. Blanchett must have a consensus to lead such a fight, wishing him well.

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