Discover winter according to NFB – Journal Le Nord

While the snow was falling in large flakes last Saturday, I discovered some treasures hidden on the National Office website. From the movie, onf.ca. For you, I have picked the best short films that include snow, winter, and landscapes in the north. Perfect for an evening curfew, if you don’t want to go out to play.

Jack Rabbit – centennial skater (1976, 29 minutes)

Discover the man behind the legend who has crossed the Laurentianes for decades and traced its most important paths. This painting, produced to celebrate Herman Smith-Johannsen’s centenary, reveals a relentless explorer, resilience and sense of humor. The documentary draws parallels between his native Norway and his adopted Lorentine sons, and takes us back in time. In one scene, we see him recounting his memories in a car, a cigar in his mouth, while a snow-covered landscape parades through the window.

Proportions and turns (1948, 10 minutes)

In black and white, this short film provides an overview of skiing in Canada, from Banff to the Laurentians. There we find the enthusiasm for the first snow, the ski lesson, the ski lift ‘Less brave’ (The narrator says), and the spectacular spectacle once you reach the top. In general, the sport has changed very little after 73 years.

Ski (1963, 10 minutes)

A Day at the Rink, introduced by Gail Karl, the famous Quebec filmmaker in his early days. Even Claude Levier’s music animates this short film without words. In boots or skis we discover the fun of skating, sliding and playing on snow. Why not play friendly hockey, Before swinging on the ice to the rhythm of today’s music: rock and roll!

How to build your own igloo (1949, 10 minutes)

Follow these two Inuit (referred to as the Eskimo in the movie) as they build an igloo at night, as the narrator shows you how to do so. All you need is an ice knife … and an iceberg. Inuit can take 40 minutes or two to build an igloo, depending on their needs.

Canadian landscapes (1941, 17 minutes)

My favorite. Follow artist Alexander Young Jackson as he design his unique landscapes. Jackson is a member of the Group of Seven, a gathering of Canadian landscape architects who revolutionized art in the 1920s. To make his drawings, Jackson went on an expedition to autumn nature in Ontario, then to Lake Grace, then to the hills. Snow-covered area in Saint-Tite-des-Caps north of le d’Orlén. We see it in a canoe, a carriage, and even climb the rocky faces of the Canadian Shield, all to find the perfect landscape.

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