The poverty that children see

What is it like to be poor in your opinion? In this group interview, we are playing a game, and the girls take turns drawing a piece of paper on which a poverty question is written. They themselves participated in formulating some of these questions.

Nine-year-old girl breaks the ice: Le premier mot qui me passe par la tête quand je pense au mot ”pauvre”, c’est SDF (personne sans domicile fixe), qui prend trop de drogue, qui s’est fait virer de sa maison ou qui est mis in the street.

However, this little girl is herself one of the 17.7% of Canadian children who live below the poverty line. This is calculated by Campaign 2000, based on Statistics Canada data on taxpayers in 2019.

About 17.7% of Canadian children live in poverty.

Photo: iStock

Her older sister contradicts her: I’ve seen a lot of movies! Then she replied.

It depends on what kind of poor you want to talk about. There are people who will, on occasion, say that money doesn’t buy happiness, but technically, if you don’t have money, you are more likely to be sad and die. »

Quote from 12-year-old Janoaz

she is right. The Statistical Institute of Quebec (ISQ) notes a 10-year difference in life expectancy between CLSCs located in the most advantaged and disadvantaged areas of large cities in Quebec, according to 2019 data.

A kid fiddling with tickets for the game Monopoly.

Poverty is a concept that has different meanings in the minds of children.

Photo: Radio Canada

Their friend, who is also nine years old, adds: We are poor, but we have a roof, we have everything we need to live.

However, having a ceiling does not necessarily mean that an individual has the necessary income for decent housing. In Quebec, more than 300,000 households have housing deemed inappropriate, unaffordable, or of inadequate size, according to data collected in the 2016 census.

Poverty in the eyes of others

12-year-old Janoaz says it’s really changing the way he sees people, and money. If I didn’t have a lot of money and bought my clothes at a thrift store, my friends would see me differently. Every time they started talking about money, I would be embarrassed. People can make fun of him and he can make you feel bad about yourself.

Over the years in elementary school, I learned to get used to and accept this difference more.

Two friends talking in a low voice in the schoolyard in the winter.

Two friends talking in a low voice in the schoolyard.

Photo: Radio Canada

Anyway, I tell myself that my mother is working hard to give us money she adds.

It should be noted that a quarter (26.5% in 2018) of single-parent families in Quebec, mainly led by women, are considered low-income, according toStatistics Institute of Quebec.

Another question taken from the hat: Do you see your mom nervous about money sometimes?

Unanimous answer: Yeah. Testimonials keep coming. When I ask her to buy things, she doesn’t say that, but I can see that she’s nervous says one of the girls. I feel it, I see it, but it doesn’t really let it show And another added.

A lady notices that her wallet is empty.

Poverty is hard for many parents.

Photo: iStock

Sometimes, when little girls can go so far as to give money to their mother. It’s over when I see her Accelerates I give it to her and she doesn’t always take my money, because she knows she won’t be able to get my money back.

Despite all these concerns, one thing is certain for them.

I know my mother will always have money to feed me. I know she will always be there for me. »

Quote from young jin

Even if they don’t have the multi-section jeans, the latest phones and the most extravagant gadgets, the three Genoese agree that they’re rich.

Me, I even think I’m very lucky to have a family Older arrow. Her friend completed it: We have a beautiful family that loves us and we have so much love.

See also  Several shootings Sunday in the Greater Toronto Area, including three shootings in broad daylight

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.