Andre de Grasse and Marco Arup win at the Classic Prefontaine Stadium

The Canadian won the 100 meters when he flew over the track in Eugene, Oregon, in just 9 seconds 74/100. This is less time than his personal mark 9 BC 89/100, which was founded in Tokyo.

However, he was helped by the wind blowing inside the stadium, so his performance will not be officially recorded.

I feel very good! I knew I was in great shape when I got hereHe said after winning. It was great to be able to run with people in the stands.

In Japan, De Grasse finished third behind Italian Marcell Jacobs and American Fred Kerley.

This time De Grasse was ahead of Kerley, who finished second with a time of 9sec/78sec. Ronnie Baker completed the podium with a stopping time of 9.82/100.

The competition was very tough, with eight of the nine participants running under the 10-second mark.

Italian Jacobs for his part decided to do deadlock in this event The following is for recovery.

I did really well when I got out of the lumps, and I’m grateful for the result.

Quote from:Andre de Grasse

De Grasse’s time on Saturday (9 seconds 74/100) is lower than the Canadian record, which was shared by Donovan Bailey and Bruni Soren (9 seconds 84/100). However, due to the wind force, estimated at 2.9 m / s, the performance will not be smoothed.

However, the 26-year-old Antarian is sending a clear signal, in anticipation of the upcoming World Athletics Championships, which will be held at Eugene Stadium, from July 14 to 24.

See also  Bianca Andreescu continues on her way

De Grasse said it was my first time here, great facilities. I can’t wait to come back here for both worlds.

For now, I’m going to run the races one by one, and we’ll see what happens.

Marco Arup has reached the top

Soon after there deep disappointment In Tokyo, Marco Arup recovered brilliantly by winning the 800m race in Eugene.

The Winnipeg native completed the course in a masterful time of 1:44 51/100, a time that would have earned him a medal at the last Olympics.

He beat Olympic medalists Ferguson Cheriot Rotich (1:45.02) and Emmanuel Kipkoroy Courier (1:45.05) at the finish line.

In Japan, Currier triumphed in the 800m thanks to a time of 1 minute 45 seconds and 6/100. Arup could not participate in this race, he braked in the semi-finals. He then cut the distance in 1 minute, 44 seconds, and 90/100, an insufficient performance to deserve a place for the final set.

Marco Arup has no reason to miss his shot in TokyoAnalyst Laurent Goodbot explained to Radio Canada Sports on Friday before the competitions began. In his group, you have Courier and Rotich who were first and second in Tokyo. It could be interesting. He can ride the train and have a good time.

With this victory, 22-year-old Arup also came close to his best, 1:42:26/100.

For the last 200 metres, I found myself a little further than I expected. But I didn’t see anyone behind me, so it was fineHe said after the race. That’s why I love to run! The support I have received over the years is tremendous.

Aaron Brown at the foot of the podium

Runner Aaron Brown ran in the 200-meter race, and finished fourth, behind three Americans.

See also  Alain Côté is dealing with Lightning and thinks it will end tonight

Noah Lyles took the gold with a competition record of 19.52/100. It’s also the best time of the season.

His countrymen Kenneth Bednarek and Josephus Lyles complete the podium.

Another Canadian, Jerome Blake, finished sixth, lowering his personal mark at the same time. He has run the distance in 20 seconds 20/100, while he has never run this distance less than 20 seconds and 38/100 in the past.

Other Canadian results:

  • Gabriella Debus-Stafford: 6e (1500 AD)
  • Reagan Yee: 11 H (3000 AD steeplechase)
  • Alicia Butterworth et al: 10e (3000m contraindications)
  • Sage Watson: 9th place (400m hurdles)
  • Annika Newell: V (pole vault)
  • Andrea Sikavin: 12 AH (5000 AD)
  • Muhammad Ahmad: 8e (miles)

Jamaican rule continues, Shakari Richardson collapses

On the women’s front, Jamaica went on to win the 100 metres. The same result was repeated for the Tokyo Olympics, with Sherika Jackson, Shelley-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson-Hera taking third, second and first places, respectively.

More dazzling than she was in Tokyo, Thompson-Herah once again lowered her personal mark. She led the way in 10.54/100s, a Diamond League stage record.

All eyes were on American Shikari Rickardson, who was unable to compete in the Tokyo Olympics after that Suspended due to positive result to test for steroids.

The bright young woman had wowed the show at the US Olympic Trials, a few days before her suspension was announced, winning the race in 10sec/86/sec.

This time, she delivered a disappointing 11sec 14/100, good for the last row.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *