Esports enthusiasts vie for the title at Amos

For three days, they were able to compete in skill and discuss their passion.

“We know esports is developing everywhere, and we wanted to organize something for young people, bring them out and bring them together,” explains Pascal Bellanger, co-founder of Vision ESports. We also realize that people of all ages love the game and we have expanded the activities to the entire entertainment sector to reach the widest possible range. We are happy with this first edition. We want to make Amos the main arena for competitions in the region. »

Pascal Bellanger, co-founder of Vision ESports

Photo: Radio Canada/Marc-Andre Landry

Among the enthusiasts present in Amos were many young e-sports in e-sports programs at Iberville High School in Rouyn-Noranda, or in Cégep de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue.

Their coach, Gabriel Arsenault, explains that the program’s arrival in schools has finally been well received by parents.

“A lot of parents were skeptical, but I have a strong message for young people. He explains that if they don’t have a balanced life, they can’t do well in games. They are competitive, they want to be the best. When they understand that they should also have a social life. And to fulfill their responsibilities and that this will help them perform, their eyes are open. They are ready to do their homework and struggle on school benches.”

Gabriel Arsenault, e-sports coach at Iberville School and Cégep.

Gabriel Arsenault, e-sports coach at Iberville School and Cégep.

Photo: Radio Canada/Marc-Andre Landry

Jean-Christophe Legrand of Ville-Marie is preparing to start his second season with Cégep’s e-sports team. In addition to having a lot of fun and improving his playing skills, he says he got a lot of motivation from the experience.

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“I’ve always loved games and would do the same if the program wasn’t in school, but that adds reason,” he says. Personally, this helps me because the tactics make you think of yourself. You have to learn to be your best to help your team. »

The Vision ESports conference was also an opportunity for Abitibi e-sports organization to announce its activities. For the past few years, fans have been gathering at Amos every week for high-level competitions at Smash Bros..

“It is fun to be able to show the world what we can do as a community and that we are ready to grow,” says Matthias Eibacher, tournament organizer for the organization. There are many games, such as Fortnite, where you can only play online. But you don’t experience the same atmosphere as organizing this kind of tournament. I’m a sofa player, and I love to be with my friends. This whole community, they love it, it’s clear and subtle. »

Matthias Ebacher, tournament organizer for Abitibi E-Sports.

Matthias Ebacher, tournament organizer for Abitibi E-Sports.

Photo: Radio Canada/Marc-Andre Landry

Speaking at the conference, Gabriel Arsenault hopes to make his fans aware of the importance of playing in all aspects of life.

“It’s great as an event. Esports are often judged by others and that is normal because sometimes there is abuse. There is a minority who gamble a lot. I often recommended for someone who doesn’t want to be a professional to play no more than 16 hours a week. If we could From sending a message, this is just a game and it’s normal to play it. You just have to respect the game, it has always been a part of being human.”

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