Tuesday, May 28, 2024

The annual science meeting in Kingston was a great success

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It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know how successful the annual science meeting at Queen’s University in Kingston has been. However, someone may have been on site and available to put this theory to the test on Saturday at Slush Puppie Place.

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Thousands of curious, smiling and awestruck guests were amazed by everything from robotic dogs to enchanting chemical magic to a live show packed with amazing facts and circus acts at Saturday’s event, which featured 60 booths showcasing topics ranging from wildlife conservation to robots and robotics. Climate change and much more.

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“We are one of the largest centers of scientific discovery in the country,” said its founder and driving force, Dr. Linda Colgan.

One need look no further than the hundreds of families wandering wide-eyed around the downtown square’s exterior and interior, snapping photos and trying their hand at dozens of interactive displays.

“Just take a look around and see the smiles on these kids’ faces,” said a beaming Colgan as she posed for a photo with famed dinosaur restorer Peter May next to his display of the killer whale’s skeletal remains. “The joy I feel is that some of the kids who came here as little kids, as visitors when they were kids, are now here to demonstrate or perform. Something special happens when they come here, which inspires them to continue in STEM fields.”

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Colgan, a Whig-Standard columnist, founded the event in 2011, when she said about 500 people came through the doors the first year.

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“Last year, we had 5,334 visitors and nearly 500 volunteers, so we are continuing to grow because we have amazing support from the university and the community,” she said. year.

Despite the current economic downturn, which even powerful institutions like Queen’s are feeling, the school and community, as well as supporters, continue to support the event, Colgan said.

“(Queens) is very supportive of this work,” she said. “Then people like Peter May from Research Casting International, bring these displays at no cost to the organization. All these labs have brought all this equipment to display and share out of the goodness of their hearts.”

Colgan said work for the annual event begins in September and culminates on the day of the event.

“We start in September to get ready for May, and then the last month is just crazy,” she said with a laugh.

After a short, well-deserved break after the event, Colgan will begin writing her annual event report before beginning preparations for next year’s event.

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Twitter.com/Jan_Murphy

Research Casting International owner Peter May and Queen’s University Science Meet founder Dr. Linda Colgan with May displaying the skeletal remains of a killer whale at the 13th annual Queen’s University Kingston Science Meet at Slush Puppie Place in Kingston on Saturday, May 11, 2024. Thousands of Kingston residents gathered to participate In this interactive and popular event. (Jan Murphy/Kingston Whig Standard/Postmedia Network) Photography by Jan Murphy /Right-wing standard
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Young guests interact with robotic dogs at the 13th Annual Queen’s University Kingston Science Fair at Slush Puppie Place in Kingston on Saturday, May 11, 2024. (Jan Murphy/The Kingston Whig-Standard/Postmedia Network) Photography by Jan Murphy /Right-wing standard
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Young guests examine different types of fossils at the 13th Annual Queen’s University Kingston Scientific Meeting at Slush Puppie Place in Kingston on Saturday, May 11, 2024. (Jan Murphy/The Kingston Whig-Standard/Postmedia Network) Photography by Jan Murphy /Right-wing standard
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A young guest expresses his feelings about the skeletal remains of a killer whale at the 13th Annual Science Fair at Queen’s Kingston University at Slush Puppie Place in Kingston on Saturday, May 11, 2024. Displays at the event included robotics, a display of Leonardo da Vinci’s helicopter, an armored vehicle, a chemistry magic show and a model Miniature 3D printed house, brains, hearts, robots and more. Thousands of Kingston residents gathered to participate in this interactive and popular event. (Jan Murphy/Kingston Whig Standard/Postmedia Network) Photography by Jan Murphy /Right-wing standard

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